Film Club 2021-22
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We're Diverting the Plane from Paris!
parisFilm Club Live! Screening: Francesco

Thursday, Oct. 14 | 7:00 p.m. | Grand Pavilion

romeFilm Editing Part 2: Moulin Rogue!

Thursday, Oct. 28 | 7:00 p.m. via Zoom

 

There’s been a slight change in our itinerary. Our Zoom visit to Moulin Rouge! is being delayed two weeks to Oct. 28. We’d never shake things up like this without a very good reason—and we have one. We’re heading to Rome to meet Pope Francis!

 

Film Club has been given a very special opportunity to share with you the documentary, Francesco, and meet its producer/director, Evgeny Afineevksy. This will be a Film Club Live! Event - registration coming soon! To find out more about the documentary and the filmmaker: CLICK HERE. Viva il Papa

  

Moulin Rouge! - New Date: Oct. 28!

moulin rougeWe return to Paris—but a very different one—in 2001’s Moulin Rouge! The temper and tone of director Baz Luhrmann’s movie set at the end of the 19th century are a world apart from the gentle post-war Paris envisioned by Minnelli. Central to the film is the chaotic hubbub of the cabaret, Moulin Rouge, and its seemingly endless cast of characters.

 

Moulin Rouge! is a “jukebox” musical, and its score often adds to its pace. There is so much popular music in the film that it took Luhrmann over two years to secure the rights to the songs.

 

The film is often in turbo drive. The can-can sequence, for example, lasts 65 seconds and includes an astounding 85 edits. Yet the brilliance of screen editor, Jill Bilcock, keeps viewers engaged in what’s happening despite the breathtaking sensory explosion. She puts you right there…right in the middle of Moulin Rouge.

 

Bilcock explained, “Baz and I have a very low attention span. We tend to think everybody can see everything in a few frames. It’s a tapestry: the sum of the whole equals the end result. It may feel like it could be a bit fast, but it’s actually adding up to a dramatic, emotional effect.”

 

Moulin Rouge! features Ewan McGregor and Nicole Kidman. The film received two Oscars.

 

See the Registration tab below for our Zoom registration!

 

Delis Alejandro, (310) 566-1530 or   

We're Diverting the Plane from Paris!
parisFilm Club Live! Screening: Francesco

Thursday, Oct. 14 | 7:00 p.m. | Grand Pavilion

romeFilm Editing Part 2: Moulin Rogue!

Thursday, Oct. 28 | 7:00 p.m. via Zoom

 

There’s been a slight change in our itinerary. Our Zoom visit to Moulin Rouge! is being delayed two weeks to Oct. 28. We’d never shake things up like this without a very good reason—and we have one. We’re heading to Rome to meet Pope Francis!

 

Film Club has been given a very special opportunity to share with you the documentary, Francesco, and meet its producer/director, Evgeny Afineevksy. This will be a Film Club Live! Event - registration coming soon! To find out more about the documentary and the filmmaker: CLICK HERE. Viva il Papa

  

Moulin Rouge! - New Date: Oct. 28!

moulin rougeWe return to Paris—but a very different one—in 2001’s Moulin Rouge! The temper and tone of director Baz Luhrmann’s movie set at the end of the 19th century are a world apart from the gentle post-war Paris envisioned by Minnelli. Central to the film is the chaotic hubbub of the cabaret, Moulin Rouge, and its seemingly endless cast of characters.

 

Moulin Rouge! is a “jukebox” musical, and its score often adds to its pace. There is so much popular music in the film that it took Luhrmann over two years to secure the rights to the songs.

 

The film is often in turbo drive. The can-can sequence, for example, lasts 65 seconds and includes an astounding 85 edits. Yet the brilliance of screen editor, Jill Bilcock, keeps viewers engaged in what’s happening despite the breathtaking sensory explosion. She puts you right there…right in the middle of Moulin Rouge.

 

Bilcock explained, “Baz and I have a very low attention span. We tend to think everybody can see everything in a few frames. It’s a tapestry: the sum of the whole equals the end result. It may feel like it could be a bit fast, but it’s actually adding up to a dramatic, emotional effect.”

 

Moulin Rouge! features Ewan McGregor and Nicole Kidman. The film received two Oscars.

 

See the Registration tab below for our Zoom registration!

 

Register to Join Us!

 

IMPORTANT!  You must re-register for 2021-2022 Film Club Zoom events, even if you were registered last season. You will need A NEW PERSONAL LINK FOR THE COMING SEASON! Once you register, your link will be sent to you in a confirmation email. Click the tab below to register!

 

If you haven’t yet registered for Film Club Zoom events, click the button below.
You only have to register once to gain access to all future discussion!

 

Click Here to Register for the 2021-2022 Season!

 

MORE ABOUT FILM CLUB ZOOM EVENTS

Please watch Moulin Rouge! before we meet in October. During our Zoom events, Fr. David Guffey, CSC, Director, Family Theater Productions, will discuss the films and the part film editing played in each. You will have plenty of time to share your opinions in the main room and in breakout groups. Fr. David will release a study guide prior to each event that will be sent to those on the Film Club email list. If you are not on the list, you can add your name through the next tab.

 

Join the E-mail List!

2021 02 16 16 08 19If you are not on the Film Club e-mail list and wish to receive promotion matierals for future events,  click the link below!

 

Click Here to Join Our E-mail List!

 

*Sample e-mail to the left!

 

 

Industry Insiders!

Calling all Industry Insiders!

Fr. David and the Film Club would be thrilled to receive your recommendations for guest speakers who are involved in some aspect of film making. If you know someone who you think would be an interesting guest, contact with your suggestions.
  

About Film Club

What is Film Club?
Screenings with Meanings

The Film Club brings together movie lovers for a monthly discussion on a selected film. The 2019-2020 theme is Art of Cinema and with each film is chosen not only for its meaning, but also in the context of a specific aspect of filmmaking (e.g., screenwriting, set decoration). It’s amazing how much more you can see once you begin to appreciate the techniques that make one film stand out from the rest.

 

The Film Club also hosts two seasonal events: A Holiday Party, featuring a classic Christmas movie, and Oscar Night, where we review the nominated films and vote for our “best picture of the year.” (Our track record for predicting the Oscar has been uncanny.)

 

The Film Club meets in the Grand Pavilion on the second Thursday of the month from September through May. Our discussions are led by Father David Guffey, CSC, Director, Family Theater Productions.

 

Season Schedule

2021-2022 Season: A Look Ahead

The Film Club Core Team will soon be finalizing all the movies for the 2021-2022 Art of Cinema series that will begin in September. Like many other St. Monica groups, we will continue to host Zoom events and offer in-person events. The preliminary schedule is below. Please note that our two most popular Film Club events—Christmas and our Oscar nominated film review—will be in-person as will be a season kickoff featuring the Family Theater Productions documentary: The House that Rob Built. As you might imagine, in-person events might differ in format from our pre-Covid gatherings.

 

Our Zoom gatherings will be focusing on film editing and directing over the course of the season. If you were a fan of the And the Winner Should Have BeenOscar® format, we’ll be offering that experience in February via Zoom. (Can you imagine? Two Oscar nights in one season!) We will end the season once again with a classic film.

 

Get ready to vote! We’ll be asking Film Club members to choose our Christmas and classic movies. Details in the months ahead.

2021-2022 Film Club Schedule

 

Zoom Event Date                     

Topic & Film

 

Live Event Date                 

Topic & Film
 Sep. 9 Film Editing: An American in Paris  Late Sep. - TBD The House the Rob Built
 Oct. 14 Film Editing: Moulin Rouge!      
 Nov. 11 Film Directing: TBD    
    Dec. 9 Christmas - TBD
 Jan. 13 Film Directing - TBD    
Feb. 10 Oscar® Night - And the Winner Should Have Been    

 

  Mar. 3 Oscar® Night: Review of the Nominated Films

April 7

Film Directing: TBD    
May 12 Classic: TBD    

 

 

 

That's a Wrap!

2021 Survey: the Results Are In

Film Club! We’ve calculated the results of the 2020-2021 season-end survey. Thanks to the 74 respondents for your support, insightful comments, and some excellent suggestions. Here’s an overview of the results:

  • Favorite filmJulie & Julia was the clear winner.
  • Oscar® Night—There was a close race between those who preferred our 2021 format (And the winner should have been…) vs. our previous format (viewing and discussing trailers for the Best Picture nominees). A third group liked both! So, no clear results there.
  • Film Club format—Again, we had a diversity of opinion. One camp said “in-person,” a similarly sized camp said “online,” and a third camp said they had no preference. The comment section led us to believe that those preferring the in-person Film Club events missed watching the movies together and getting out for the night, while those preferring the Zoom format commented on its convenience and the insightful conversation.
  • Timing—Here’s something most people agreed on! The length of the Zoom events (about 1.5 hours average) was “just right.” We’ll keep this in mind as we plan our future in-person events which previously ran about 3 hours.
That's A Wrap: A Man for All Seasons
man wrapA Look Back at an Extraordinary Man 

Film Club is back from a whirlwind trip to Tudor England—and what a trip it was! We dropped in on Sir Thomas More in 1520 and became immersed in his controversy with King Henry VIII. More sacrificed his life rather than sanction the King’s schism with the Roman Catholic Church and his divorce from Catherine of Aragon.

 

This was our 2020-2021 season finale. We welcomed over 50 guests and, as you can imagine, the discussion focused on More’s unwavering integrity and faith as well as the superb filmmaking. A Man for All Seasons won six key Oscars and, looking at it 55 years after its release, you can see why it was such an awarded effort.

That's A Wrap: Oscar® Night

oscars4Over 60 Film Club fans turned up for our “reimagined” Oscar® Night on Apr. 8. Instead of focusing on this year’s  nominated films that few people have seen, we went back to yesteryear to look at films that some think “should have won” Best Picture honors. Four panelists and film experts, Clare Denk, Fr. Mike Russo, Brian Frates and Fr. David Guffey, made their cases to overturn previous Best Picture awards. A quick poll in breakout groups gave a nod to each of these panelists and their suggestions. Therefore, the Film Club is proud to announce that Best Picture awards should have gone to Wizard of Oz (1939), Citizen Kane (1941), Giant (1956) and Raging Bull (1980). The evening left plenty of time for participants to chat about disappointments that they’d experienced with past Oscars®, resulting in much animated—and definitely delightful—conversation. A special moment capped the evening: The Film Club awarded its first Lifetime Achievement Award. The recipient was our own Fr. David Guffey to honor his 30th Anniversary as a priest of the Congregation of Holy Cross.

 

That's a Wrap: Star Wars 
A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away ...

 

We took off on a galactic journey on Mar. 8 when we discussed 1977’s Star Wars and its ground-breaking special star wars effects. The event brought lots of insightful conversation and shared memories…even Princess Leia and an Imperial officer showed up! Although the special effects in this first Star Wars are remarkable, especially for the time in which they were created, the essence of the story is what keeps the film a favorite for generations of movie goers. Fr. David Guffey, CSC, Director, Family Theater Productions, said, “It takes more than visual effects to make a movie impactful.” Star Wars’ enduring themes of honor, friendship and combating evil, as presented in its mythical universe, appeal to the best in us. The film challenges us and transports us. In writing about the film in 1977, critic Robert Ebert said, “…the magic of Star Wars is only dramatized by its special effects; the movie’s heart is in its endearingly human (and non-human) people.” (1977’s first Star Wars has been retitled Star Wars Episode IV—A New Hope since it now has three prequels.)

 

oscars

 

That's A Wrap: Amélie
Love was in the air…  amelie2

The Film Club shared a delightful evening on Feb. 11 talking about Amelie, the shy, clever and generous heroine of the movie that bears her name. As a child starved for love, she grew into a young woman living within herself…not sure how to find love. By happenstance, she realized she could find joy by cleverly and covertly helping others become happier. And, in the end, through the wisdom and concern of a neighbor with whom she shared time, she was able to take the big step and seek the love and affection that she so wanted. As discussion leader, Father David Guffey, said, “Amelie’s desire to make other people have more joyful lives eventually opens her up to love.” This charming, modern-day fairytale, set in a perfect Paris, has a happy ending for those who knew Amelie and for Amelie herself.

 

 

lawrence

 

We're Back from the Desert...

The shimmering sands and endless vistas of the desert were the topic of discussion as the Film Club focused on the cinematography in the epic Lawrence of Arabia. The majestic landscape was itself a character in David Lean’s revered film and, with the help of discussion leader, Father David Guffey, we were able to envision the difficulties and intricacies of filming a movie of this magnitude in such a challenging environment.

 

The movie portrays the exploits (real and exaggerated) of British military man, T. E. Lawrence. Despite the grandeur of the film, it offers an intimate look at a time and place full of daring-do and political intrigue and a world in the midst of difficult cultural and economic transition. The portrait of Lawrence, played by then-newcomer Peter O’Toole, shows a man looking for his next success but not learning from his failures. His charisma won him followers. His exhibitionism earned him fame. His ego allowed him to be manipulated. And in the end, did anyone really know who he was…including himself?

 

Christmas Movies Lit Up the Night

The Film Club kicked off the holiday season with a look at a very American film genre, the Christmas movie. With all the Christmas movies from which to choose, there were several winners (all classics), when guests were asked to choose favorites in several categories: o henrys production still

  • Best-ever movie Santa (number one choice): Edmund Gwenn who played Kris Kringle in Miracle on 34th Street (1947)
  • Your personal “can’t-ever-miss” Christmas movie (too close to call): It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) and A Christmas Carol (multiple versions)
  • Best Christmas movie angel (a toss-up): Cary Grant who played Dudley in The Bishop’s Wife (1947) and Henry Travers who played Clarence in It’s a Wonderful Life (1946).

 

The film version of a classic Christmas story was also discussed that night—O. Henry’s The Gift of the Magi. It was part of the 1953 film anthology, O. Henry’s Full House. You’ll remember, the story is about a young couple who each, unbeknownst to the other, sacrificed their most precious possessions to buy the other the perfect Christmas gift. Ironically, she sold her beautiful hair to buy him a chain for his heirloom watch and he sold his watch to buy her ornamental combs for her hair. The power of O. Henry’s writing—on- and off-the-screen—had the Film Club talking about the twist ending—and the power of love—103 years after the short story was first published.

 

After a night of Christmas films past, Father David Guffey, who led the night’s discussion, shared some meaningful thoughts. He said, “Wonderful things can happen if we leave room for them to occur, even in what may seem to be far off from the ideal Christmas. We’ve all seen how Christ can come in very unexpected ways. How can we make room for grace to break in? As we approach this Christmas, let us consider how we can be the angels, the Santa’s, the bearers of light? How can we bring grace into others’ lives?”

 

Julie & Julia Dished up a Great Evening!

The November Film Club served up a delightful feast for over 50 Film Club members who discussed Norah fourthEphron’sfilm, Julie & Julia. The movie centers on a contemporary food blogger, Julie Powell, and her culinary idol, Julia Child. Their connection was Julie’s famous cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, now approaching 2-million copies in print. As part of the Film Club’s Art of the Cinema series, our focus was the film’s costuming by Hollywood veteran, Ann Roth, that subtly and successfully bridged the time gap between the women’s lives and highlighted the parallel challenges they faced generations apart. One participant said, “I’ll never look at a movie the same again. It was really remarkable how the costumes helped tell the story and hold the film together.” 

 

Click Here to Download the November Discussion Guide!

That's a Wrap: Mission Accomplished

On Oct. 8, Film Club discussed the powerful film, The Mission, made even more so by the soaring score composed by the legendary Ennio Morricone. The music creates the backdrop for this compelling drama that depicts a time when church, state and greed created an unholy alliance in 18th century South America. The score artfully combines liturgical chorales, native drumming and Iberian-influenced music, giving voice to the various constituencies involved in the conflict that arose over a Jesuit mission, the indigenous Guarani it served, and the Portuguese who wished to conquer and exploit both.

 

Audience takeaways included the role the score plays in following the arc of the story, beginning with the simplicity of the melodious Gabriel’s Oboe to the complex On Earth as It Is in Heaven. Attention was also paid to the outstanding cinematography (it won the Oscar) and how it is made even more memorable by its musical accompaniment. Most agreed that The Mission is a remarkably moving film—one they won’t soon forget.

 

Hickory dickory dock…Hugo ran the clocks

September’s Film Club discussion of Martin Scorsese’s first (and only) family adventure—Hugo—kicked off our 2020-2021 Art of Cinema season on a truly positive and uplifting note. The winner of five Oscars, the movie centers on the exploits of an orphaned boy who secretly keeps the clocks running in a 1930’s Parisian train station. His solitary life changes when he is befriended by the adventurous Isabelle. Through his interaction with her and others (including an automaton!) and his need to fix things (including himself), Hugo eventually creates his own sense of belonging and positively influences the lives of others who frequent the station. One of the people he meets and impacts (and vice versa) is real-life French film pioneer, Georges Méliès, who is Isabelle’s grandfather. The film was a glimpse into Méliès’ genius that repurposed his considerable skills as a magician to those of an early and notable film producer. You can see Méliès’ ground-breaking 1902 adventure film, A Trip to the Moon, that’s featured in Hugo, here.

 

Hugo is adapted from Brian Selznick’s 2007 book The Invention of Hugo Cabret that spent 42 weeks on the New York Times best seller list for children. Selznick has some Hollywood in his blood: He is the grandson of legendary Hollywood producer, David O. Selznick. For more about the adapted screen play, check out Fr. Vince Kuna’s blog on the topic.

 

Hugo has many outstanding qualities, including its award-winning soundtrack. Two of its Oscars were for sound (best mixing and best editing)—while others were awarded for cinematography, production design and special effects. While acknowledging all of these technical accolades, many in the Film Club felt that Hugo and it's lasting appeal has more to do with the wonderfully told story about opening yourself up, reaching out and embracing the purpose of your life.

 

Click Here to Download the September 2020 Discussion Guide!

 

Just Mercy

The film, Just Mercy, was the focus of July’s virtual Film Club. Based on an actual case in the early career of Byron Stevenson, now an acclaimed public interest lawyer, the film shows not only Stevenson’s unbending desire to seek justice and mercy but also gives the viewer an unsettling glimpse of what it’s like to be helplessly and unjustly accused or imprisoned. The film, set in 1980s Alabama, portrays a justice system that often delivered just the opposite to the poor and people of color.

 

Joining in the conversation led by Fr. David Guffey, CSC, Director, Family Theater Productions, was Monsignor Torgerson and 77 Film Club followers eager to share their reactions to the movie. Fr. Guffey said, “Great storytelling in film offers us a way to live inside the life of other people to share in their experiences and so widen our perspective on life. Though the real events on which the film was based occurred over 30 years ago, the issues of race-based prejudice are remarkably contemporary. This makes the film especially important now. It is important to have the conversation we had at Film Club. It will be important to continue the conversations about race as we listen to the stories of people most affected, and together envision ways of reform based on the universal dignity of every person as a beloved child of God.”

 

Many also commented about Bryon Stevenson and his inspirational life’s work. One person said, “When you look at what he decided to do, you have to believe that he was guided by the Holy Spirit.” The Monsignor commented, “As a young man, he could have written his ticket and gone to any important law firm. Instead, he chose a more difficult and rewarding path.”

 

Indeed, Bryon Stevenson is the hero of the film and his work continues today. You may be interested in reading about two of his recent projects—a memorial and a museum in Montgomery, AL—designed to recognize the suffering of many while serving as a catalyst for informed, societal change. Click on the links to find interesting stories about The Legacy Museum and the Memorial to Peace and Justice.

 

The Film Club will not be discussing a movie with you in August so we can take the time to prepare for next season when our Art of Cinema series returns. We’ll be giving you news as it evolves at stmonica.net/filmclub—and we can hardly wait (as the old song goes…) to see you in September.

 

Little Women

It had been a long hot day leading up to the virtual Film Club on June 11, but you’d never know it listening to the animated discussion about Greta Gerwig’s Little Women. Fr. David Guffey led the discussion and Fr. Vince Kuna offered his perspectives, as he compared the book with the screen adaptation. Guests were given the chance to have an “around-the-dinner-table” discussion in break-out groups, before a general discussion that touched on Gerwig’s unique and contemporary approach to the classic story, the outstanding acting, character development, cinematography, set design, choreography and even the story’s backdrop: The Civil War. 

 

Click Here to Download the Discussion Guide for Little Women

 

Field of Dreams
It’s true. If you build it…they will come

Over 100 people joined the Film Club’s virtual get together on May 14, featuring Phil Alden Robinson, Director and Screenwriter of our film of the month, Field of Dreams. The conversation afforded an insider’s view of how the film evolved from a novel to a major motion picture and let us in on the challenges and rewards along the way. A big thank you to Phil Robinson, our guest, Fr. David, our moderator, and all of you who helped create such a wonderful evening.

  film club field of dreams wphil robinson

 

Archive

 

 

 

 2020-2021 Film Club Schedule  

 Date Topic Film
September 10 Sound Hugo
October 8 Original Musical Score The Mission
November 12 Costume Design Julie & Julia
December 10 Holiday O, Henry's Full House
January 14 Cinematography 1 Lawrence of Arabia
February 11 Cinematography 2 Amelie
March 11 Visual Effects TBD
April 8 Oscars  
May 13 Multiple Categories A Man for All Seasons

 

 

  • The Art of Cinema Series: 2019-2020 Season            

     

    September

     

    History of Film

     October

     

    The Apartment 

    Screenwriting

     November

     

    Vertigo

    Mis-en-scene

     

    December

     

    Christmas in Connecticut

     January

     

    City Slickers

    Set Decoration

     

    February

     

    Oscar Night

     March

     

    Julie & Julia*

    Costume Design

     April

     

    Darkest Hour*

    Makeup

    May

     

    A Man For All Seasons

    Classic*

     

    *Replaced by virtual Film Club discussions of Groundhog Day (March), Rear Window (April) and Field of Dreams (May).

     

    2018-2019 Season
    September Gravity
    October Cinema Paradiso
    November Hidden Figures
    December White Christmas
    January Stan & Ollie
    February Oscar Night
    March A Man of His Word
    April Of Gods and Men
    May The African Queen

     

     

    2017-2018 Season
    September The Way
    October A Beautiful Mind
    November A Man Called Ove
    December The Bishops Wife
    January The Post
    February Oscar Night
    March  Nine to Five
    April  Inside Out
    May Roman Holiday

     


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Mon–Fri 12:10 pm - Livestream & Church 

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Sat Vigil 5:30 pm - Church

 

Sun 7:30 am - Church

Sun 9:30 am - Livestream, Church & Grand Pavilion

Sun. 11:30 am - Church

Sun 4 pm - Outdoors on Hilton School Yard Lawn

Sun 5:30 pm - Church & Livestream

 

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Mon-Fri 5:30–6 pm

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Sat 4:30–5:00 pm

 

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